Is Website Accessibility Still Relevant? – accessiBe

still relevant

Yes, website accessibility is still relevant. For example, many people with disabilities rely on web accessibility tools like accessiBe to be able to access and use online content. Additionally, as the population ages, more people with age-related impairments will need accessible websites.

Web accessibility is also important from a legal standpoint. Laws have been enacted that require public-facing websites to meet certain accessibility standards in many countries. And in the United States, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to all businesses with a website, regardless of size.

Here are some of the main reasons that website accessibility is still relevant:

Accessibility features provide a better experience for all users

Accessibility features are not just for disabled users—they can benefit everyone. For example, features like alt text and page titles improve the overall organization and navigation of a website.

Some accessibility features are required by law

In many countries, laws have been enacted that require public-facing websites to meet certain accessibility standards. And in the United States, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to all businesses with a website, regardless of size.

The number of people with disabilities is increasing

As the population ages, more people with age-related impairments will need accessible websites. Additionally, the number of people with disabilities is increasing due to the rise in chronic conditions such as diabetes and obesity.

Web accessibility is good for business

Making your website accessible can help you reach a wider audience and improve your bottom line. Accessible websites are easier to use, which means that more people will be able to find the information they’re looking for. And when users have a positive experience on your site, they’re more likely to come back.

Many people with disabilities rely on web accessibility features

Many people with disabilities rely on web accessibility features to be able to access and use online content. For example, people who are blind or have low vision may use screen readers to read website content. In addition, deaf or hard of hearing people may need captions or transcripts to understand video content.

The population is aging

As the population ages, more people with age-related impairments will need accessible websites. For example, older adults may have difficulty using a mouse and may need to use keyboard shortcuts or alternative input devices.

What’s Next?

If you’re not sure where to start with making your website accessible, we can help. We’ve put together a list of best practices for web accessibility.

Best Practices for Web Accessibility

The following are some general best practices for making your website accessible:

  • Use clear and plain language
  • Organize content in a logical way
  • Use headings and lists to improve readability
  • Provide alt text for images
  • Add captions or transcripts for videos
  • Include audio descriptions of visuals for people who are blind or have low vision
  • Make sure your website can be navigated using a keyboard
  • Ensure that forms can be completed using a keyboard
  • Design for touchscreens
  • Use color carefully
  • Test your website regularly to ensure accessibility

Final thoughts on web accessibility

Web accessibility is still relevant for many reasons. From a legal standpoint, it benefits all users, and it’s especially important for people with disabilities who rely on web accessibility features to access online content. In addition, making your website accessible can help you reach a wider audience and improve your bottom line.

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